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Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University | Interoperability Case Studies | August 15, 2013 | By Manik Suri

Open311Open311 is a state-of-the-art technology platform that provides a uniform base to expand existing “311” services, which provide information tracking and monitoring in cities around the world. Over the past decade, these 311 services have allowed cities to respond to millions of citizen-generated inputs, creating better and smarter governance. This paper applies “interoperability” theory to consider the promises and perils of Open311, explaining how we can unlock the full potential of this powerful civic technology platform in the future. Read the full piece here.

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Harvard Law and Policy Review | Volume 7, No. 2: Summer 2013 | By Manik Suri

Presidential SealDebate over whether law can, and indeed should, constrain presidential power is as old as the Republic. This article claims that liberal legalists, who adopt a consequentialist “Holmesian” view of the law, ignore the possibility that law  as an internalized normative commitment or duty – can restrain the executive. This alternative “Hartian” view may help explain how laws constrain presidential power at key moments in history. Recognizing the difficulty in establishing causation, the article nonetheless concludes that much is at stake in how we frame the relationship between law and the executive. Read the full piece here.

Harvard National Security Journal | March 25, 2013 | By Gerard Kennedy, Innokenty Pyetranker, and Manik Suri

Courtroom Lawfare

American courtrooms are now one of the hottest battlefields in the ongoing Global War on Terrorism. In recent months, U.S. federal courts have issued several opinions that offer insights into one particularly significant area of terrorism-related jurisprudence: civil suits against financial institutions that allegedly support terrorist groups. Two such opinions issued by the Second Circuit, Linde v. Arab Bank, PLC and Rothstein v. UBS AG, merit special attention because of their far-reaching implications. Read the full piece here.

India America Today | November 21, 2012 | By Manik Suri

Obama victoryWhile Indian Americans were solidly within the Obama camp, the challenge in this election lay in making sure their voice was heard only 63 percent had voted in 2008. The three million-strong community’s widespread distribution  particularly in contested states – meant that they could help move the needle where it counted. Now, looking back at the 2012 election, Indian Americans who voted should feel proud: they were joined by record numbers of voters across key liberal constituencies, including Latinos and African Americans, who delivered at the ballot box – toppling conservative pundits’ electoral models, challenging long-held assumptions, and igniting a firestorm within the Republican leadership over their party’s ability to connect with an electorate that is increasingly diverse. Read the full piece here.

India America Today | October 27, 2012 | By Manik Suri

Indian Americans are amongst President Obama’s most committed backers, but less than two-thirds of the 3-million strong community’s eligible voters showed up at the ballot box in 2008. This time around, no one can afford to stay on the sidelines. Each of us must head to the polls not only because we believe in a better future – the very reason our families came to this country – but because we are committed to shaping it ourselves. Doing so will strengthen the community’s political voice. But more importantly, it could help decide an election where the stakes are high, margins are razor-thin, and every vote counts. Read the full piece here.

The Diplomat | October 11, 2012 | By Manik Suri

President Obama’s engagement with India rests on the twin pillars of common values and converging interests. Our liberal democracies face common challenges across Asia – from combating fundamentalist violence in the west to preventing authoritarian power plays in the east. Obama’s foresighted India policy has advanced democracy, boosted our economy, and left America stronger. Governor Romney, meanwhile, has hardly mentioned India, reflecting a deeper failure to formulate a strategic vision for U.S. foreign policy in the 21st century – yet another sign that he is dangerously out-of-touch with present day realities. Read the full piece here.

Harvard National Security Journal | September 3, 2012 | By Manik Suri

Over the past decade, national security policymakers have encouraged greater use of numbers, probabilities and estimative language to enhance intelligence and improve decision-making. Such efforts should be praised, yet they suffer from serious shortcomings that still need to be addressed. Read the full piece here.