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trade

Harvard International Law Journal | Volume 54, Issue 1: Winter 2013 | By Manik Suri

Immanuel Kant’s 1795 essay, “Toward Perpetual Peace,” established a concept of cosmopolitan law as the nemesis of war, instilling in generations of liberal thinkers and practitioners a vision of a world without conflict. Kant’s paradigm posited that “republican constitutions, a commercial spirit of international trade, and a federation of interdependent republics” would provide the basis for a “perpetual peace” amongst states bound together under international law. Yet cultural relativists since the time of Kant have argued that only certain nations – namely those with a “Europeanized” culture – are capable of coming together to secure this lasting peace. This article challenges such claims and assesses the contemporary relevance of Kant’s ‘perpetual peace’ in light of one of the key geopolitical developments of our time: the rise of China. Read the full piece here.

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RealClearMarkets | August 30, 2012 | By Manik Suri

The United States urgently needs an ambitious trade strategy for the world’s fastest growing region: Asia. An obvious place to begin would be India — one of its largest emerging markets. While newly launched talks on an investment agreement with New Delhi couldn’t be more propitious, the Obama administration must commit serious political capital to overcome protectionist opposition and build on considerable bipartisan consensus in favor of deeper U.S.-India economic ties. Read the full piece here.

The U.S. Studies Center at the University of Sydney | August 21, 2012 | By Devesh Kapur and Manik Suri

Asia is witnessing a growing divergence between “geoeconomics” and “geopolitics,” centered around China. While China offers unparalleled near-term economic opportunities, cumulative decisions taken by thousands of American, Japanese, Taiwanese, and Korean firms are ironically helping to build these countries’ most formidable strategic competitor. Beijing’s growing competitiveness – and assertiveness – are forcing Asian nations to hedge against the risks created by deepening economic networks binding the region together. Read the full piece here. (Forthcoming as a chapter in the Oxford Handbook of the Economics of the Pacific Rim)

Harvard National Security Journal | November 13, 2011 | By Manik Suri

While the United States has built one of the most sophisticated export control regimes in the world, its Cold War era architecture must be transformed to reflect today’s realities and meet tomorrow’s challenges. In 2010, President Obama launched a comprehensive Export Control Reform Initiative that, once implemented, will mark a vital step toward promoting U.S. national security and economic competitiveness in the 21st century. Read the full piece here.